Mags Loves Jimi

“They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn't. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.” ― Frida Kahlo

Month: April, 2017

Under|stated

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“Not everything you do needs to be seen, heard or discussed.”
— Miles Pierré #JustSaying

artwork by Frédéric Forest

via The Artidote

Make Me (Up)

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Artwork by  #DARIABIRANGXINEZANDVINOODH

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When I started wearing makeup, the world began to change. I mean this literally: I was a thirteen-year-old girl in the post-9/11 world. Seeing my mother in her black patent shoes with rouged lip-paint; she was a war hero, at her best. She shone with a palette different from my own, a contrast to the innocuous person I thought I was.

Stereotypes only furthered this innocuoucy. Women who wear makeup are insecure. Women of colour who wear makeup are trying to be something they’re not. I’ve heard it all before. My thirteen-year-old self knew the weight of those words and feared it.

John Dovidio, a professor of psychology at the University of Connecticut, stated this in an ABC article: “When you’re a social animal, you need to be able to distinguish who’s a friend and who’s a foe. You need to understand who’s a member of your pack, who’s a member of a different pack.”

Australia is a multicultural society, full of colourful people rich with culture. One would assume because we are surrounded by difference there would be an immunity to stereotypes. This is far from the case. Bias opinions are involuntary and unconscious. But to adhere to a stereotype even after the preconceived assumption is broken or revealed is a testament to our relationship with trust.

Professor Dovidio also assured in the same article, “We categorize people automatically, unconsciously, immediately, based on a person’s race and based on a person’s sex.”

These sounds like clichés, don’t they? Judging someone based on their race or sex is basis of the Hollywood marketing mix—a surefire way to ignite discourse and disagreements within a pleasurable setting. According to Merriam-Webster, there’s a difference between a ‘stereotype’ and a ‘cliché’. The words cliché and stereotype both come from the French; in fact, cliché is French for stereotype. In modern language cliché means ‘an overly familiar or commonplace phrase, theme, or expression, whereas stereotype means ‘an often unfair and untrue belief that many people have about all people or things with a particular characteristic.’

It’s interesting how a cliché and a stereotype are branches from the same tree, yet have two very different meanings. One could be an explanation of the other—it is a cliché to stereotype. It’s also a stereotype to call something too familiar a cliché—a case of semantics. What we know for sure is stereotypes hold negative connotations. Chimamanda Adichie, when asked via The Atlantic what American’s get wrong about Africa, affirms this poignantly: “I don’t think stereotypes are problematic because they’re false. That’s too simple. Stereotypes are problematic because they’re incomplete.”

Research studies conducted by cognitive and social psychologists reveal we have different stereotypes for different social contexts. Have you ever been a room full of people who looked like the direct opposite of you, aesthetically? Say you have jet black hair and the room is full of blondes. Suddenly a Mattel-filled minefield comes to mind—Attack of the Blondes by Barbie. You start to think of a time where you felt overwhelmed by noticeable differentiation. A very simple example (and perhaps a cliché of the dumb and dangerous Blonde – shoutout to Marilyn Monroe) but a common theme.

How do we combat these feelings of self-consciousness without falling into the trap of compartmentalization and dissention? I’m reminded of what my favourite marketing maverick and people-person, Seth Godin, wrote about in his blog about our ability to be judgmental yet call out others for the same thing:

“Everyone believes that other people are terrible at judging us and our potential, but we go ahead and proudly judge others on the basis of a short interview (or worse, a long one), even though the people we’re selecting aren’t being hired for their ability to be interviewed. The first step in getting better at pre-judging is to stop pre-judging. This takes guts, because it feels like giving up control, but we never really had control in the first place.”

So, if stereotypes are based on a fear of lack of control, then shouldn’t we focus on how we deal with controlling a narrative? Insert the beauty business who promote self-love yet dictate how you should present that love to the public.

Is there a double standard for the tattoo and piercing artist who goes to church every Sunday? What about the virgin who enjoys pole fitness? How about the chubby girl who swears she isn’t ‘eating her feelings’ or the skinny minny who just doesn’t like to eat as much. A stereotype would be to assume the tattoo artist is not a devoted Christian, the dancer is a slut, and as for the girls on the opposite physical spectrum, well they must be sad.

The moral of this story is stereotypes have negative and uncontrollable reactions and consequences that usually affect others internally. To reiterate what Seth Godin stated, we are all guilty of pre-judging others because of the belief they’re judging us wrong. I can safely say my thirteen-year-old self didn’t want to be stereotyped as the girl of colour who wanted to stand out. Now as an adult double that age and then some, I can understand that a stereotype is just another way to fill in blanks to the unconvinced. The best course of action is to not convince yourself something about someone else without any personal experience whilst balancing this with a good healthy dose of common sense.

By Margretta Sowah


 

This article was written by Margretta Sowah; a freelance writer and Fashion Marketer based in Sydney. All opinions expressed are her own. She cannot be held liable for bad taste. She also likes to spin yarn from time to time. Read more at:  Blaire Creatives 

Breaking Bad (Habits)

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2.13am. A downtown loft. In a glitter-esqe façade, rugs of Persia are merely design accents. Down the hall, in a small room full of mirrors, a woman stares at her vanity cabinet. Red pill. Blue pill. Yellow pill. White. How much can I take in one night? A friend raps at the door: “everything okay in there?” A small voice says, “Yes, just taking my medication, give me a sec.” The friend leaves, nodding knowingly. The woman is in pain, after all.

There seems to be a foggy, sexy stigma against prescription pills, or any pills, for that matter – the sort of over-achieving sibling of the drug la familia. According to an article in The Conversation: ‘The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has called for submissions on the idea of deleting Codeine from Schedule 3 (pharmacy only) availability and moving it to Schedule 4 (prescription only).’

This does not come lightly. Studies show Codeine is not as potent without the other components added to make it marketable and therefore ‘stronger’. In the Cochrane review, findings showed researchers would need to treat 12 people with 60mg of Codeine alone to achieve a 50% reduction in acute pain for one person. Talk about a Placebo; so I guess it’s not Every You, Every Me?

In the Western world, we don’t play games with pain the same way we do with pleasure. When it comes to treating pain relief at your GP, the more subjective, the bigger the script can be. Speaking from personal experience with an immediate family member battling mental health (Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, to randomly quote a Smashing Pumpkins song), I have questioned the scripts plenty of times. But I’m reminded of this: who’s place is it to say you’re not in enough pain to warrant any medication?

That’s not the purpose of this investigation into Codeine. It’s about treating the cause, not the symptom. Having said that, the decision to change how we access Codeine may be a bit of a hassle. Sometimes waiting at the doctor’s office is more of a headache than the actual headache. Wouldn’t you want a permanent fix, if possible, instead of the Band-Aid effect of Codeine? I know which one I’d prefer, but I also know what I’d be more likely to do.

When it comes to Class A-Z drugs, prescription and over-the-counter, we’re essentially talking about the same family—the whole clan: cousins, nieces, nephews, and let’s not forget any parties who are made accountable by God and the State (the step-mum/dad and whatever step-in-between), y’all included too. These medications are used to alter, magnify or numb pain in the human body. Modern medicine has shown us this, and so has the drug epidemic. Bottom line is this: we do NOT want to be in, stay in, or be subject to possible pain (unless you’re into BDSM; in that case, how you doin’?), but at what lengths and at the cost of whom?

Reports show there are much better alternatives to Codeine containing OTC formulations with a combination dose of 200mg ibuprofen/500mg paracetamol. This was made effective in a head-to-head trial against paracetamol 500mg/Codeine 15mg tablets. The truth is an unsupervised dosage can have serious risks with no real benefits. No doubt a fair share of GPs and hospitals have seen cases of liver damage due to high paracetamol doses. I’ve seen my fair share of overindulgence in pills unfortunately for no other reason but boredom.

Regular Codeine use can cause chronic rebound headaches with difficulties in reducing or stopping the dosage. Countries such as the US, Sweden and Germany have already made the shift from over-the-counter to prescription only. Will there be change from documented harm due to addiction from addictive and non-addictive doses? Only time can tell. It will take more than just a prescription to shift the view society has on the benefits of Codeine. Staff working in pharmacies will not be able to consistently monitor potential substance abusers, because there is no one-size-fits-all expression.

Regardless of whether this is passed in profession is not the point. We need to reevaluate how we see pain and how we deal with it. One white pill here could save a life; another could end it. The choice, undoubtedly, belongs to you. The difference could save you from being a statistic, instead of part of the solution.

By Margretta Sowah


 

This article was written by Margretta Sowah; a freelance writer and Fashion Marketer based in Sydney. All opinions expressed are her own. She cannot be held liable for bad taste. She also likes to spin yarn from time to time. Read more at:  Blaire Creatives